Risk factors

Risk for pneumococcal pneumonia increases with age2,3
Compared to healthy adults aged 65 and older, the risk of pneumococcal pneumonia increases with the presence of certain chronic conditions.3*
Data from a retrospective cohort study from 3 large, longitudinal, US healthcare databases of medical and outpatient pharmacy claims from 2007-2010.3
*Risk ratios were calculated using rates of pneumococcal pneumonia among healthy adults aged 65 and older as a baseline (67 cases per 100,000 person-years).3
For immunocompetent adults, multiple chronic conditions may further compound risk for pneumococcal pneumonia compared to healthy adults aged 65 and older3
  • In this study, the patients were considered to be “at-risk,” not “high-risk,” adults3
  • In this study, 95% of the adults did not have immunocompromising disorders; 3.5% of the patients had 1 of several autoimmune diseases, and 1.4% of the patients were on oral steroids3
  • Adult clinical studies for Prevnar 13® included immunocompetent adults with stable underlying conditions, including chronic cardiovascular disease, chronic pulmonary disease, renal disorders, diabetes mellitus, chronic liver disease, and medical risk conditions and behaviors (eg, alcoholism and smoking) that are known to increase the risk for serious pneumococcal pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease4
  • Immunogenicity data for Prevnar 13® in adults who are at high risk for pneumococcal disease are limited to individuals with HIV infection or with a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The effectiveness in these and other high-risk populations is not established4
  • Immunocompromised individuals or individuals with impaired immune responsiveness due to the use of immunosuppressive therapy may have reduced antibody response4
Risk for pneumococcal pneumonia increases with age2,3
Compared to healthy adults aged 50-64, the risk of pneumococcal pneumonia increases with the presence of certain chronic conditions.3†
Data from a retrospective cohort study from 3 large, longitudinal, US healthcare databases of medical and outpatient pharmacy claims from 2007-2010.3
Risk ratios were calculated using rates of pneumococcal pneumonia among healthy adults aged 50-64 as a baseline (25 cases per 100,000 person-years).3
Prevnar 13® use in immunocompetent adults aged 50-64 is beyond the current ACIP recommendations but within the FDA indication.1,4
For immunocompetent adults, multiple chronic conditions may further compound risk for pneumococcal pneumonia compared to healthy adults aged 50-643
  • In this study, the patients were considered to be “at-risk,” not “high-risk,” adults3
  • In this study, 94% of the adults did not have immunocompromising disorders; 4.4% of the patients had 1 of several autoimmune diseases, and 1.7% of the patients were on oral steroids3
  • Adult clinical studies for Prevnar 13® included immunocompetent adults with stable underlying conditions, including chronic cardiovascular disease, chronic pulmonary disease, renal disorders, diabetes mellitus, chronic liver disease, and medical risk conditions and behaviors (eg, alcoholism and smoking) that are known to increase the risk for serious pneumococcal pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease4
  • Immunogenicity data for Prevnar 13® in adults who are at high risk for pneumococcal disease are limited to individuals with HIV infection or with a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The effectiveness in these and other high-risk populations is not established4
  • Immunocompromised individuals or individuals with impaired immune responsiveness due to the use of immunosuppressive therapy may have reduced antibody response4
ACIP=Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; CDC=Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; HIV=human immunodeficiency virus.